Chapter 2.5


Class 5 - Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides

2.5.0

Introductory note

Because of the differing properties exhibited by dangerous goods within classes 5.1 and 5.2, it is impracticable to establish a single criterion for classification in either class. Tests and criteria for assignment to the two classes are addressed in this chapter.

2.5.1

Definitions and general provisions

In this Code, class 5 is divided into two classes as follows:

Class 5.1 - Oxidizing substances

Substances which, while in themselves not necessarily combustible, may, generally by yielding oxygen, cause, or contribute to, the combustion of other material. Such substances may be contained in an article;

Class 5.2 - Organic peroxides

Organic substances which contain the bivalent -O-O- structure and may be considered derivatives of hydrogen peroxide, where one or both of the hydrogen atoms have been replaced by organic radicals. Organic peroxides are thermally unstable substances which may undergo exothermic self-accelerating decomposition. In addition, they may have one or more of the following properties:

  • be liable to explosive decomposition;

  • burn rapidly;

  • be sensitive to impact or friction;

  • react dangerously with other substances;

  • cause damage to the eyes.

2.5.2

Class 5.1 - Oxidizing substances

Note: For the classification of oxidizing substances to class 5.1, in the event of divergence between test results and known experience, judgement based on known experience shall take precedence over test results.

2.5.2.1
Properties
2.5.2.1.1
Substances of class 5.1 in certain circumstances directly or indirectly evolve oxygen. For this reason, oxidizing substances increase the risk and intensity of fire in combustible material with which they come into contact.
2.5.2.1.2
Mixtures of oxidizing substances with combustible material and even with material such as sugar, flour, edible oils, mineral oils, etc., are dangerous. These mixtures are readily ignited, in some cases by friction or impact. They may burn violently and may lead to explosion.
2.5.2.1.3
There will be a violent reaction between most oxidizing substances and liquid acids, evolving toxic gases. Toxic gases may also be evolved when certain oxidizing substances are involved in a fire.
2.5.2.1.4
The above-mentioned properties are, in general, common to all substances in this class. Additionally, some substances possess specific properties, which shall be taken into account in transport. These properties are shown in the Dangerous Goods List in chapter 3.2.
2.5.2.2
Oxidizing solids
2.5.2.2.1
Classification of solid substances of class 5.1
2.5.2.2.1.1

Tests are performed to measure the potential for the solid substance to increase the burning rate or burning intensity of a combustible substance when the two are thoroughly mixed. The procedure is given in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part III, subsection 34.4.1 (test O.1) or alternatively, in subsection 34.4.3 (test O.3). Tests are conducted on the substance to be evaluated mixed with dry fibrous cellulose in mixing ratios of 1:1 and 4:1, by mass, of sample to cellulose. The burning characteristics of the mixtures are compared:

  1. in the test O.1, with the standard 3:7 mixture, by mass, of potassium bromate to cellulose. If the burning time is equal to or less than this standard mixture, the burning times shall be compared with those from the packing group I or II reference standards, 3:2 and 2:3 ratios, by mass, of potassium bromate to cellulose respectively; or

  2. in the test O.3, with the standard 1:2 mixture, by mass, of calcium peroxide to cellulose. If the burning rate is equal to or greater than this standard mixture, the burning rates shall be compared with those from the packing group I or II reference standards, 3:1 and 1:1 ratios, by mass, of calcium peroxide to cellulose, respectively.

2.5.2.2.1.2

The classification test results are assessed on the basis of:

  1. the comparison of the mean burning time (for the test O.1) or burning rate (for the test O.3) with those of the reference mixtures; and

  2. whether the mixture of substance and cellulose ignites and burns.

2.5.2.2.1.3

A solid substance is classified in class 5.1 if the 4:1 or 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, exhibits:

  1. in the test O.1, a mean burning time equal to or less than the mean burning time of a 3:7 mixture (by mass) of potassium bromate and cellulose ; or

  2. in the test O.3, a mean burning rate equal to or greater than the mean burning rate of a 1:2 mixture (by mass) of calcium peroxide and cellulose.

2.5.2.2.2

Assignment of packing groups

Solid oxidizing substances are assigned to a packing group according to one of the test procedures in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part III, subsection 34.4.1 (test O.1) or subsection 34.4.3 (test O.3), in accordance with the following criteria:

  1. Test O.1:

    1. Packing group I: any substance which, in the 4:1 or 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, exhibits a mean burning time less than the mean burning time of a 3:2 mixture, by mass, of potassium bromate and cellulose;

    2. Packing group II: any substance which, in the 4:1 or 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, exhibits a mean burning time equal to or less than the mean burning time of a 2:3 mixture (by mass) of potassium bromate and cellulose, and the criteria for packing group I are not met;

    3. Packing group III: any substance which, in the 4:1 or 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, exhibits a mean burning time equal to or less than the mean burning time of a 3:7 mixture (by mass) of potassium bromate and cellulose , and the criteria for packing groups I and II are not met;

    4. Not class 5.1: any substance which, in both the 4:1 and 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, does not ignite and burn, or exhibits mean burning times greater than that of a 3:7 mixture (by mass) of potassium bromate and cellulose.

  2. Test O.3:

    1. Packing group I: any substance which, in the 4:1 or 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, exhibits a mean burning rate greater than the mean burning rate of a 3:1 mixture (by mass) of calcium peroxide and cellulose;

    2. Packing group II: any substance which, in the 4:1 or 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, exhibits a mean burning rate equal to or greater than the mean burning rate of a 1:1 mixture (by mass) of calcium peroxide and cellulose, and the criteria for packing group I are not met;

    3. Packing group III: any substance which, in the 4:1 or 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, exhibits a mean burning rate equal to or greater than the mean burning rate of a 1:2 mixture (by mass) of calcium peroxide and cellulose, and the criteria for packing groups I and II are not met;

    4. Not class 5.1: any substance which, in both the 4:1 and 1:1 sample-to-cellulose ratio (by mass) tested, does not ignite and burn, or exhibits a mean burning rate less than the mean burning rate of a 1:2 mixture (by mass) of calcium peroxide and cellulose.

2.5.2.3
Oxidizing liquids
2.5.2.3.1
Classification of liquid substances of class 5.1
2.5.2.3.1.1
A test is performed to determine the potential for a liquid substance to increase the burning rate or burning intensity of a combustible substance or for spontaneous ignition to occur when the two are thoroughly mixed. The procedure is given in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part III, 34.4.2 (test O.2). It measures the pressure rise time during combustion. Whether a liquid is an oxidizing substance of class 5.1 and, if so, whether packing group I, II or III shall be assigned, is decided on the basis of the test result (see also Precedence of hazard characteristics in 2.0.3).
2.5.2.3.1.2

The classification test results are assessed on the basis of:

  1. whether the mixture of substance and cellulose spontaneously ignites;

  2. the comparison of the mean time taken for the pressure to rise from 690 kPa to 2070 kPa gauge with those of the reference substances.

2.5.2.3.1.3
A liquid substance is classified in class 5.1 if the 1:1 mixture, by mass, of substance and cellulose tested exhibits a mean pressure rise time less than or equal to the mean pressure rise time of a 1:1 mixture, by mass, of 65% aqueous nitric acid and cellulose.
2.5.2.3.2
Assignment of packing groups
2.5.2.3.2.1

Liquid oxidizing substances are assigned to a packing group according to the test procedure in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part III, 34.4.2, in accordance with the following criteria:

  1. Packing group I: any substance which, in the 1:1 mixture (by mass) of substance and cellulose tested, spontaneously ignites; or the mean pressure rise time of a 1:1 mixture (by mass) of substance and cellulose is less than that of a 1:1 mixture (by mass) of 50% perchloric acid and cellulose;

  2. Packing group II: any substance which, in the 1:1 mixture (by mass) of substance and cellulose tested, exhibits a mean pressure rise time less than or equal to the mean pressure rise time of a 1:1 mixture (by mass) of 40% aqueous sodium chlorate solution and cellulose; and the criteria for packing group I are not met;

  3. Packing group III: any substance which, in the 1:1 mixture (by mass) of substance and cellulose tested, exhibits a mean pressure rise time less than or equal to the mean pressure rise time of a 1:1 mixture (by mass) of 65% aqueous nitric acid and cellulose; and the criteria for packing groups I and II are not met;

  4. Not classified as class 5.1: any substance which, in the 1:1 mixture (by mass) of substance and cellulose tested, exhibits a pressure rise of less than 2070 kPa gauge; or exhibits a mean pressure rise time greater than the mean pressure rise time of a 1:1 mixture (by mass) of 65% aqueous nitric acid and cellulose.

2.5.3
Class 5.2 - Organic peroxides
2.5.3.1
Properties
2.5.3.1.1
Organic peroxides are liable to exothermic decomposition at normal or elevated temperatures. The decomposition can be initiated by heat, contact with impurities (such as acids, heavy-metal compounds, amines), friction or impact. The rate of decomposition increases with temperature and varies with the organic peroxide formulation. Decomposition may result in the evolution of harmful, or flammable, gases or vapours. For certain organic peroxides the temperature shall be controlled during transport. Some organic peroxides may decompose explosively, particularly if confined. This characteristic may be modified by the addition of diluents or by the use of appropriate packagings. Many organic peroxides burn vigorously.
2.5.3.1.2
Contact of organic peroxides with the eyes is to be avoided. Some organic peroxides will cause serious injury to the cornea, even after brief contact, or will be corrosive to the skin.
2.5.3.2
Classification of organic peroxides
2.5.3.2.1

Any organic peroxide shall be considered for classification in class 5.2, unless the organic peroxide formulation contains:

  1. not more than 1.0% available oxygen from the organic peroxides when containing not more than 1.0% hydrogen peroxide; or

  2. not more than 0.5% available oxygen from the organic peroxides when containing more than 1.0% but not more than 7.0% hydrogen peroxide.

Note: The available oxygen content (%) of an organic peroxide formulation is given by the formula:

\(16 \times \sum(n_i \times c_i / m_i)\)

where:

ni
= number of peroxygen groups per molecule of organic peroxide i;
ci
= concentration (mass %) of organic peroxide i;
mi
= molecular mass of organic peroxide i.
2.5.3.2.2
Organic peroxides are classified into seven types according to the degree of danger they present. The types of organic peroxide range from type A, which may not be accepted for transport in the packaging in which it is tested, to type G, which is not subject to the provisions for organic peroxides of class 5.2. The classification of types B to F is directly related to the maximum quantity allowed in one packaging.
2.5.3.2.3

Organic peroxides permitted for transport in packagings are listed in 2.5.3.2.4, those permitted for transport in IBCs are listed in packing instruction IBC520 and those permitted for transport in portable tanks are listed in portable tank instruction T23. For each permitted substance listed, the generic entry of the Dangerous Goods List (UN 3101 to UN 3120) is assigned, appropriate subsidiary risks and remarks providing relevant transport information are given. The generic entries specify:

  1. organic peroxide type (B to F);

  2. physical state (liquid or solid); and

  3. temperature control, when required (see 2.5.3.4).

2.5.3.2.3.1
Mixtures of the listed formulations may be classified as the same type of organic peroxide as that of the most dangerous component and be transported under the conditions of transport given for this type. However, as two stable components can form a thermally less stable mixture, the self-accelerating decomposition temperature (SADT) of the mixture shall be determined and, if necessary, temperature control applied as required by 2.5.3.4.
2.5.3.2.4

List of currently assigned organic peroxides in packagings

Note: Packing Method codes "OP1" to "OP8" refer to packing methods in packing instruction P520. Peroxides to be transported shall fulfil the classification and the control and emergency temperatures (derived from the SADT) as listed. For substances permitted in IBCs, see packing instruction IBC520, and for those permitted in tanks, see portable tank instruction T23.

Number (generic entry) ORGANIC PEROXIDE Concentration (%) Diluent type A (%) Diluent type B (%)(1) Inert solid (%) Water (%) Packing method Control temperature (°C) Emergency temperature (°C) Subsidiary risks and remarks
3101 tert-BUTYL PEROXYACETATE > 52-77 ≥ 23 OP5 (3)
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE > 80 - 100 OP5 (3)
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)-3,3,5-TRIMETHYLCYCLOHEXANE > 90 - 100 OP5 (3)
METHYL ETHYL KETONE PEROXIDE(S) see remark (8) ≥ 48 OP5 (3) (8) (13)
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXYNE-3 > 86 - 100 OP5 (3)
3102 tert-BUTYL MONOPEROXYMALEATE > 52 - 100 OP5 (3)
3-CHLOROPEROXYBENZOIC ACID > 57 - 86 ≥ 14 OP1 (3)
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE > 52 - 100 ≤ 48 OP2 (3)
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE > 77 - 94 ≥ 6 OP4 (3)
DI-4-CHLOROBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP5 (3)
DI-2,4-DICHLOROBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP5 (3)
2,2-DIHYDROPEROXYPROPANE ≤ 27 ≥ 73 OP5 (3)
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(BENZOYLPEROXY)HEXANE > 82 - 100 OP5 (3)
DI-(2-PHENOXYETHYL) PEROXYDICARBONATE > 85 - 100 OP5 (3)
DISUCCINIC ACID PEROXIDE > 72 - 100 OP4 (3) (17)
3103 tert-AMYL PEROXYBENZOATE ≤ 100 OP5
tert-AMYLPEROXY ISOPROPYL CARBONATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP5
n-BUTYL-4,4-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)VALERATE > 52 - 100 OP5
tert-BUTYL HYDROPEROXIDE > 79 - 90 ≥ 10 OP5 (13)
tert-BUTYL HYDROPEROXIDE + DI-tert-BUTYL PEROXIDE < 82 + > 9 ≥ 7 OP5 (13)
tert-BUTYL MONOPEROXYMALEATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP6
tert-BUTYL PEROXYACETATE > 32 - 52 ≥ 48 OP6
tert-BUTYL PEROXYBENZOATE > 77 - 100 OP5
tert-BUTYLPEROXY ISOPROPYLCARBONATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP5
tert-BUTYLPEROXY-2-METHYLBENZOATE ≤ 100 OP5
1,1-DI-(tert-AMYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE ≤ 82 ≥ 18 OP6
2,2-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)BUTANE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP6
1,6-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXYCARBONYLOXY)HEXANE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP5
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE > 52 - 80 ≥ 20 OP5
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP5 (30)
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)-3,3,5-TRIMETHYLCYCLOHEXANE > 57 - 90 ≥ 10 OP5
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)-3,3,5-TRIMETHYLCYCLOHEXANE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP5
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)-3,3,5-TRIMETHYLCYCLOHEXANE ≤ 90 ≥10 OP5 (30)
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXANE > 90-100 OP5
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXYNE-3 > 52-86 ≥ 14 OP5 (26)
ETHYL 3,3-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)BUTYRATE > 77-100 OP5
ORGANIC PEROXIDE, LIQUID, SAMPLE OP2 (11)
3104 CYCLOHEXANONE PEROXIDE(S) ≤ 91 ≥ 9 OP6 (13)
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP6
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI(BENZOYLPEROXY)HEXANE ≤ 82 ≥ 18 OP5
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DIHYDROPEROXYHEXANE ≤ 82 ≥ 18 OP6
ORGANIC PEROXIDE, SOLID, SAMPLE OP2 (11)
3105 ACETYL ACETONE PEROXIDE ≤ 42 ≥ 48 ≥ 8 OP7 (2)
tert-AMYL PEROXYACETATE ≤ 62 ≥ 38 OP7
tert-AMYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXYL CARBONATE ≤ 100 OP7
tert-AMYL PEROXY-3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 100 OP7
tert-BUTYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 80 ≥ 20 OP7 (4) (13)
tert-BUTYL PEROXYBENZOATE > 52 - 77 ≥ 23 OP7
tert-BUTYL PEROXYBUTYL FUMARATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7
tert-BUTYL PEROXYCROTONATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXYLCARBONATE ≤ 100 OP7
1-(2-tert-BUTYLPEROXYISOPROPYL)-3-ISOPROPENYLBENZENE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOATE > 32 - 100 OP7
CYCLOHEXANONE PEROXIDE(S) ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP7 (5)
2,2-DI-(tert-AMYLPEROXY)BUTANE ≤ 57 ≥ 43 OP7
DI-tert-BUTYL PEROXYAZELATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE > 42 - 52 ≥ 48 OP7
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE + tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 43 +≤ 16 ≥ 41 OP7
DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)PHTHALATE > 42 -52 ≥ 48 OP7
2,2-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)PROPANE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXANE > 52-90 ≥ 10 OP7
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOYLPEROXY) HEXANE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7
ETHYL 3,3-DI-(tert-AMYLPEROXY)BUTYRATE ≤ 67 ≥ 33 OP7
ETHYL 3,3-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)BUTYRATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7
p-MENTHYL HYDROPEROXIDE > 72 - 100 OP7 (13)
METHYL ETHYL KETONE PEROXIDE(S) see remark (9) ≥ 55 OP7 (9)
METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE PEROXIDE(S) ≤ 62 ≥ 19 OP7 (22)
PEROXYACETIC ACID, TYPE D, stabilized ≤ 43 OP7 (13) (14) (19)
PINANYL HYDROPEROXIDE > 56 - 100 OP7 (13)
1,1,3,3-TETRAMETHYLBUTYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 100 OP7
3,6,9-TRIETHYL-3,6,9-TRIMETHYL-1,4,7-TRIPEROXONANE ≤ 42 ≥ 58 OP7 (28)
3106 ACETYL ACETONE PEROXIDE ≤ 32 as a paste OP7 (20)
tert-BUTYL PEROXYBENZOATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE + 2,2-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)BUTANE ≤ 12 + ≤ 14 ≥ 14 ≥ 60 OP7
tert-BUTYLPEROXY STEARYLCARBONATE ≤ 100 OP7
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 42 ≥ 58 OP7
3-CHLOROPEROXYBENZOIC ACID ≤ 57 ≥ 3 ≥ 40 OP7
3-CHLOROPEROXYBENZOIC ACID ≤ 77 ≥ 6 ≥ 17 OP7
CYCLOHEXANONE PEROXIDE(S) ≤ 72 as a paste OP7 (5) (20)
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 62 ≥ 28 ≥ 10 OP7
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE > 52 - 62 as a paste OP7 (20)
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE > 35 - 52 ≥ 48 OP7
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE ≤ 42 ≥ 13 ≥ 45 OP7
DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXYISOPROPYL)BENZENE(S) > 42 - 100 ≤ 57 OP7
DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)PHTHALATE ≤ 52 as a paste OP7 (20)
2,2-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)PROPANE ≤ 42 ≥ 13 ≥ 45 OP7
DI-4-CHLOROBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 52 as a paste OP7 (20)
2,2-DI-(4,4-DI(tert-BUTYLPEROXY) CYCLOHEXYL)PROPANE ≤ 42 ≥ 58 OP7
DI-2,4-DICHLOROBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 52 as a paste with silicon oil OP7
DI-(1-HYDROXYCYCLOHEXYL)PEROXIDE ≤ 100 OP7
DIISOPROPYLBENZENE DIHYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 82 ≥ 5 ≥ 5 OP7 (24)
DILAUROYL PEROXIDE ≤ 100 OP7
DI-(4-METHYLBENZOYL) PEROXIDE ≤ 52 as paste with silicon oil OP7
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(BENZOYLPEROXY)HEXANE ≤ 82 ≥ 18 OP7
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXYNE-3 ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7
DI-(2-PHENOXYETHYL) PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 85 ≥ 15 OP7
ETHYL 3,3-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)BUTYRATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7
([3R-(3R,5aS,6S,8aS,9R,10R,12S,12aR**)]-DECAHYDRO-10- METHOXY-3,6,9-TRIMETHYL-3,12-EPOXY-12H-PYRANO[4,3-j]-1, 2-BENZODIOXEPIN) ≤ 100 OP7
3107 tert-AMYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 88 ≥ 6 ≥ 6 OP8
tert-BUTYL CUMYL PEROXIDE > 42 - 100 OP8
tert-BUTYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 79 > 14 OP8 (13) (23)
CUMYL HYDROPEROXIDE > 90 - 98 ≤ 10 OP8 (13)
DI-tert-AMYL PEROXIDE ≤ 100 OP8
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE > 36 - 42 ≥ 18 ≤ 40 OP8
DI-tert-BUTYL PEROXIDE > 52 -100 OP8
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE ≤ 27 ≥ 25 OP8 (21)
DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)PHTHALATE ≤ 42 ≥ 58 OP8
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)-3,3,5-TRIMETHYLCYCLOHEXANE ≤ 57 ≥ 43 OP8
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)-3,3,5-TRIMETHYLCYCLOHEXANE ≤ 32 ≥ 26 ≥ 42 OP8
2,2-DI-(4,4-DI(tert-BUTYLPEROXY) CYCLOHEXYL)PROPANE ≤ 22 ≥ 78 OP8
METHYL ETHYL KETONE PEROXIDE(S) see remark (10) ≥ 60 OP8 (10)
3,3,5,7,7-PENTAMETHYL-1,2,4-TRIOXEPANE ≤ 100 OP8
PEROXYACETIC ACID, TYPE E, stabilized ≤ 43 OP8 (13) (15) (19)
POLYETHER POLY-tert-BUTYLPEROXYCARBONATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8
3108 tert-BUTYL CUMYL PEROXIDE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8
n-BUTYL 4,4-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)VALERATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8
tert-BUTYL MONOPEROXYMALEATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8
tert-BUTYL MONOPEROXYMALEATE ≤ 52 as a paste OP8
1-(2-tert-BUTYLPEROXYISOPROPYL)-3-ISOPROPENYLBENZENE ≤ 42 ≥ 58 OP8
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 56.5 as a paste ≥ 15 OP8
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 52 as a paste OP8 (20)
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXANE ≤ 47 as a paste OP8
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXANE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP8
3109 tert-BUTYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP8 (13)
tert-BUTYL PEROXYACETATE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 OP8
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 OP8
CUMYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 90 ≥ 10 OP8 (13) (18)
DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water OP8
DI-tert-BUTYL PEROXIDE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8 (25)
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE < 42 ≥ 58 OP8
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)CYCLOHEXANE ≤ 13 ≥ 13 ≥ 74 OP8
DILAUROYL PEROXIDE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water OP8
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)HEXANE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8
ISOPROPYLCUMYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP8 (13)
p-MENTHYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP8 (27)
METHYL ISOPROPYL KETONE PEROXIDE(S) See remark (31) ≥ 70 OP8 (31)
PEROXYACETIC ACID, TYPE F, stabilized ≤ 43 OP8 (13) (16) (19)
PINANYL HYDROPEROXIDE ≤ 56 ≥ 44 OP8
3110 DICUMYL PEROXIDE > 52 - 100 OP8 (12)
1,1-DI-(tert-BUTYLPEROXY)-3,3,5-TRIMETHYLCYCLOHEXANE ≤ 57 ≥ 43 OP8
3,6,9-TRIETHYL-3,6,9-TRIMETHYL-1,4,7-TRIPEROXONANE ≤ 17 ≥ 18 ≥ 65 OP8
3111 tert-BUTYL PEROXYISOBUTYRATE > 52 - 77 ≥ 23 OP5 +15 +20 (3)
DIISOBUTYRYL PEROXIDE > 32 - 52 ≥ 48 OP5 -20 -10 (3)
ISOPROPYL sec-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE + DI-sec-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE + DIISOPROPYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 52 + ≤ 28 + ≤ 22 OP5 -20 -10 (3)
3112 ACETYL CYCLOHEXANESULPHONYL PEROXIDE ≤ 82 ≥ 12 OP4 -10 0 (3)
DICYCLOHEXYL PEROXYDICARBONATE > 91 - 100 OP3 +10 +15 (3)
DIISOPROPYL PEROXYDICARBONATE > 52 - 100 OP2 -15 -5 (3)
DI-(2-METHYLBENZOYL) PEROXIDE ≤ 87 ≥ 13 OP5 +30 +35 (3)
3113 tert-AMYL PEROXYPIVALATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP5 +10 +15
tert-BUTYL PEROXYDIETHYLACETATE ≤ 100 OP5 +20 +25
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE > 52 - 100 OP6 +20 +25
tert-BUTYL PEROXYPIVALATE > 67 -77 ≥ 23 OP5 0 +10
DI-sec-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE > 52 - 100 OP4 -20 -10
DI-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PEROXYDICARBONATE > 77 - 100 OP5 -20 -10
2,5-DIMETHYL-2,5-DI-(2-ETHYLHEXANOYLPEROXY)HEXANE ≤ 100 OP5 +20 +25
DI-n-PROPYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 100 OP3 -25 -15
DI-n-PROPYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP5 -20 -10
ORGANIC PEROXIDE, LIQUID, SAMPLE, TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED OP2 (11)
3114 DI-(4-tert-BUTYLCYCLOHEXYL)PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 100 OP6 +30 +35
DICYCLOHEXYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 91 ≥ 9 OP5 +10 +15
DIDECANOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 100 OP6 +30 +35
DI-n-OCTANOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 100 OP5 +10 +15
ORGANIC PEROXIDE, SOLID, SAMPLE, TEMPERATURE CONTROLLED OP2 (11)
3115 ACETYL CYCLOHEXANESULPHONYL PEROXIDE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 OP7 -10 0
tert-AMYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 100 OP7 +20 +25
tert-AMYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 0 +10
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE + 2,2-DI- (tert-BUTYLPEROXY)BUTANE ≤ 31 + ≤ 36 ≥ 33 OP7 +35 +40
tert-BUTYL PEROXYISOBUTYRATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7 +15 +20
tert-BUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE > 77 - 100 OP7 -5 +5
tert-BUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 0 +10
tert-BUTYL PEROXYNEOHEPTANOATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 0 +10
tert-BUTYL PEROXYPIVALATE > 27 - 67 ≥ 33 OP7 0 +10
CUMYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 -10 0
CUMYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 87 ≥ 13 OP7 -10 0
CUMYL PEROXYNEOHEPTANOATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 -10 0
CUMYL PEROXYPIVALATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 -5 +5
DIACETONE ALCOHOL PEROXIDES ≤ 57 ≥ 26 ≥ 8 OP7 +40 +45 (6)
DIACETYL PEROXIDE ≤ 27 ≥ 73 OP7 +20 +25 (7) (13)
DI-n-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE > 27 - 52 ≥ 48 OP7 -15 -5
DI-sec-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7 -15 -5
DI-(2-ETHOXYETHYL)PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7 -10 0
DI-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 -15 -5
DIISOBUTYRYL PEROXIDE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 OP7 -20 -10
DIISOPROPYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7 -20 -10
DIISOPROPYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 OP7 -15 -5
DI-(3-METHOXYBUTYL) PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7 -5 +5
DI-(3-METHYLBENZOYL) PEROXIDE + BENZOYL (3-METHYLBENZOYL) PEROXIDE + DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 20 + ≤ 18 + ≤ 4 ≥ 58 OP7 +35 +40
DI-(2-NEODECANOYLPEROXYISOPROPYL)BENZENE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP7 -10 0
DI-(3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOYL) PEROXIDE > 52 - 82 ≥ 18 OP7 0 +10
1-(2-ETHYLHEXANOYLPEROXY)-1,3-DIMETHYLBUTYL PEROXYPIVALATE ≤ 52 ≥ 45 ≥ 10 OP7 -20 -10
tert-HEXYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 71 ≥ 29 OP7 0 +10
tert-HEXYL PEROXYPIVALATE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP7 +10 +15
3-HYDROXY-1,1-DIMETHYLBUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 -5 +5
ISOPROPYL sec-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE + DI-sec-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE + DI-ISOPROPYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 32 + ≤ 15 - 18+ ≤ 12 - 15 ≥ 38 OP7 -20 -10
METHYLCYCLOHEXANONE PEROXIDE(S) ≤ 67 ≥ 33 OP7 +35 +40
1,1,3,3-TETRAMETHYLBUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 100 OP7 +15 +20
1,1,3,3-TETRAMETHYLBUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP7 -5 +5
1,1,3,3-TETRAMETHYLBUTYL PEROXYPIVALATE ≤ 77 ≥ 23 OP7 0 +10
3116 DICETYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 100 OP7 +30 +35
DIMYRISTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 100 OP7 +20 +25
DI-n-NONANOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 100 OP7 0 +10
DISUCCINIC ACID PEROXIDE ≤ 72 ≥ 28 OP7 +10 +15
3117 tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE > 32 - 52 ≥ 48 OP8 +30 +35
DI-n-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 27 ≥ 73 OP8 -10 0
tert-BUTYL PEROXYNEOHEPTANOATE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 0 +10
1,1-DIMETHYL-3-HYDROXYBUTYL PEROXYNEOHEPTANOATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8 0 +10
DIPROPIONYL PEROXIDE ≤ 27 ≥ 73 OP8 +15 +20
3-HYDROXY-1,1-DIMETHYLBUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8 -5 +5
3118 tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 OP8 +20 +25
tert-BUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water (frozen) OP8 0 +10
DI-n-BUTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water (frozen) OP8 -15 -5
DI-2,4-DICHLOROBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 52 as a paste OP8 +20 +25
PEROXYLAURIC ACID ≤ 100 OP8 +35 +40
3119 tert-AMYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 47 ≥ 53 OP8 0 +10
tert-BUTYL PEROXY-2-ETHYLHEXANOATE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 OP8 +40 +45
tert-BUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 52 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 0 +10
tert-BUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 OP8 0 +10
tert-BUTYL PEROXYPIVALATE ≤ 27 ≥ 73 OP8 +30 +35
CUMYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 52 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 -10 0
DI-(4-tert-BUTYLCYCLOHEXYL)PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 +30 +35
DICETYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 +30 +35
DICYCLOHEXYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 +15 +20
DI-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 62 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 -15 -5
DIMYRISTYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 42 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 +20 +25
DI-(3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOYL) PEROXIDE ≤ 52 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 +10 +15
DI-(3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOYL) PEROXIDE ≤ 38 ≥ 62 OP8 +20 +25
DI-(3,5,5-TRIMETHYLHEXANOYL) PEROXIDE > 38 - 52 ≥ 48 OP8 +10 +15
3-HYDROXY-1,1-DIMETHYLBUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 52 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 -5 +5
1,1,3,3-TETRAMETHYLBUTYL PEROXYNEODECANOATE ≤ 52 as a stable dispersion in water OP8 -5 +5
3120 DI-(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 52 as a stable dispersion in water (frozen) OP8 -15 -5
DICETYL PEROXYDICARBONATE ≤ 100 OP8 +30 +35
Exempt CYCLOHEXANONE PEROXIDE(S) ≤ 32 ≥ 68 (29)
Exempt DIBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 35 ≥ 65 (29)
Exempt DI-(2-tert-BUTYLPEROXYISOPROPYL)BENZENE(S) ≤ 42 ≥ 58 (29)
Exempt DI-4-CHLOROBENZOYL PEROXIDE ≤ 32 ≥ 68 (29)
Exempt DICUMYL PEROXIDE ≤ 52 ≥ 48 (29)

Remarks

  1. Diluent type B may always be replaced by diluent type A. The boiling point of diluent type B shall be at least 60°C higher than the SADT of the organic peroxide
  2. Available oxygen ≤ 4.7%
  3. "EXPLOSIVE" subsidiary risk label required. (Model No. 1, see 5.2.2.2.2)
  4. Diluent may be replaced by di-tert-butyl peroxide
  5. Available oxygen ≤ 9%
  6. With ≤ 9% hydrogen peroxide; available oxygen ≤ 10%
  7. Only non-metallic packagings are allowed
  8. Available oxygen > 10% and ≤ 10.7%, with or without water
  9. Available oxygen ≤ 10%, with or without water
  10. Available oxygen ≤ 8.2%, with or without water
  11. See 2.5.3.2.5.1
  12. Up to 2000 kg per receptacle assigned to ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE F on the basis of large-scale trials
  13. "CORROSIVE" subsidiary risk label required (Model No. 8, see 5.2.2.2.2)
  14. Peroxyacetic acid formulations which fulfil the criteria of 2.5.3.3.2.4
  15. Peroxyacetic acid formulations which fulfil the criteria of 2.5.3.3.2.5
  16. Peroxyacetic acid formulations which fulfil the criteria of 2.5.3.3.2.6
  17. Addition of water to this organic peroxide will decrease its thermal stability
  18. No "CORROSIVE" subsidiary risk label required for concentrations below 80%
  19. Mixtures with hydrogen peroxide, water and acid(s)
  20. With diluent type A, with or without water
  21. With ≥ 25% diluent type A by mass, and in addition ethylbenzene
  22. With ≥ 19% diluent type A by mass, and in addition methyl isobutyl ketone
  23. With < 6% di-tert-butyl peroxide
  24. With ≤ 8% 1-isopropylhydroperoxy-4-isopropylhydroxybenzene
  25. Diluent type B with boiling point > 110°C
  26. With < 0.5% hydroperoxides content
  27. For concentrations more than 56%, "CORROSIVE" subsidiary risk label required (Model No. 8, see 5.2.2.2.2)
  28. Available active oxygen ≤ 7.6% in diluent type A having a 95% boil-off point in the range 200 - 260°C
  29. Not subject to the provisions for peroxide, class 5.2
  30. Diluent type B with boiling point > 130ºC
  31. Active oxygen ≤ 6.7%
2.5.3.2.5
Classification of organic peroxides not listed in 2.5.3.2.4, packing instruction IBC520 or portable tank instruction T23 and assignment to a generic entry shall be made by the competent authority of the country of origin on the basis of a test report. Principles applying to the classification of such substances are provided in 2.5.3.3. Test methods and criteria and an example of a report are given in the current edition of the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part II. The statement of approval shall contain the classification and the relevant transport conditions (see 5.4.4.1.3).
2.5.3.2.5.1

Samples of new organic peroxides or new formulations of currently assigned organic peroxides for which complete test data are not available and which are to be transported for further testing or evaluation may be assigned to one of the appropriate entries for ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE C provided the following conditions are met:

  1. the available data indicate that the sample would be no more dangerous than ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE B;

  2. the sample is packaged in accordance with packing method OP2 and the quantity per cargo transport unit is limited to 10 kg; and

  3. the available data indicate that the control temperature, if any, is sufficiently low to prevent any dangerous decomposition and sufficiently high to prevent any dangerous phase separation.

2.5.3.3

Principles for classification of organic peroxides

Note: This section refers only to those properties of organic peroxides which are decisive for their classification. A flow chart, presenting the classification principles in the form of a graphically arranged scheme of questions concerning the decisive properties together with the possible answers, is given in figure 2.5.1 in chapter 2.5 of the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods. These properties shall be determined experimentally. Suitable test methods with pertinent evaluation criteria are given in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part II.

2.5.3.3.1
Any organic peroxide formulation shall be regarded as possessing explosive properties when, in laboratory testing, the formulation is liable to detonate, to deflagrate rapidly or to show a violent effect when heated under confinement.
2.5.3.3.2

The following principles apply to the classification of organic peroxide formulations not listed in 2.5.3.2.4:

  1. Any organic peroxide formulation which can detonate or deflagrate rapidly, as packaged for transport, is prohibited from transport in that packaging under class 5.2 (defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE A);

  2. Any organic peroxide formulation possessing explosive properties and which, as packaged for transport, neither detonates nor deflagrates rapidly, but is liable to undergo a thermal explosion in that package, shall bear an "EXPLOSIVE" subsidiary risk label (Model No. 1, see 5.2.2.2.2). Such an organic peroxide may be packaged in amounts of up to 25 kg unless the maximum quantity has to be limited to a lower amount to preclude detonation or rapid deflagration in the package (defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE B);

  3. Any organic peroxide formulation possessing explosive properties may be transported without an "EXPLOSIVE" subsidiary risk label when the substance as packaged (maximum 50 kg) for transport cannot detonate or deflagrate rapidly or undergo a thermal explosion (defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE C);

  4. Any organic peroxide formulation which, in laboratory testing:

    1. detonates partially, does not deflagrate rapidly and shows no violent effect when heated under confinement; or

    2. does not detonate at all, deflagrates slowly and shows no violent effect when heated under confinement; or

    3. does not detonate or deflagrate at all and shows a medium effect when heated under confinement

    is acceptable for transport in packages of not more than 50 kg net mass (defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE D);

  5. Any organic peroxide formulation which, in laboratory testing, neither detonates nor deflagrates at all and shows low or no effect when heated under confinement is acceptable for transport in packages of not more than 400 kg/450 L (defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE E);

  6. Any organic peroxide formulation which, in laboratory testing, neither detonates in the cavitated state nor deflagrates at all and shows only a low or no effect when heated under confinement as well as low or no explosive power may be considered for transport in IBCs or tanks (defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE F); for additional provisions see 4.1.7 and 4.2.1.13;

  7. Any organic peroxide formulation which, in laboratory testing, neither detonates in the cavitated state nor deflagrates at all and shows no effect when heated under confinement nor any explosive power shall be exempted from class 5.2, provided that the formulation is thermally stable (self-accelerating decomposition temperature is 60°C or higher for a 50 kg package) and for liquid formulations diluent type A is used for desensitization (defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE G). If the formulation is not thermally stable or a diluent other than type A is used for desensitization, the formulation shall be defined as ORGANIC PEROXIDE TYPE F.

2.5.3.4
Temperature control provisions
2.5.3.4.0
The properties of some organic peroxides require that they be transported under temperature control. Control and emergency temperatures for currently assigned organic peroxides are shown in the list 2.5.3.2.4. The controlled temperature provisions are given in chapter 7.3.7.
2.5.3.4.1

The following organic peroxides shall be subjected to temperature control during transport:

  1. organic peroxides type B and C with a SADT ≤ 50°C;

  2. organic peroxides type D showing a medium effect when heated under confinement1 with a SADT ≤ 50°C or showing a low or no effect when heated under confinement with a SADT ≤ 45°C; and

  3. Organic peroxides types E and F with a SADT ≤ 45°C.

2.5.3.4.2
Test methods for determining the SADT are given in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part II, chapter 28. The test selected shall be conducted in a manner which is representative, both in size and material, of the package to be transported.
2.5.3.4.3
Test methods for determining the flammability are given in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part III, chapter 32.4. Because organic peroxides may react vigorously when heated, it is recommended to determine their flashpoint using small sample sizes such as described in ISO 3679.
2.5.3.5
Desensitization of organic peroxides
2.5.3.5.1
In order to ensure safety during transport, organic peroxides are in many cases desensitized by organic liquids or solids, inorganic solids or water. Where a percentage of a substance is stipulated, this refers to the percentage by mass, rounded to the nearest whole number. In general, desensitization shall be such that, in case of spillage or fire, the organic peroxide will not concentrate to a dangerous extent.
2.5.3.5.2

Unless otherwise stated for the individual organic peroxide formulation, the following definitions apply for diluents used for desensitization:

  1. Diluents type A are organic liquids which are compatible with the organic peroxide and which have a boiling point of not less than 150°C. Type A diluents may be used for desensitizing all organic peroxides.

  2. Diluents type B are organic liquids which are compatible with the organic peroxide and which have a boiling point of less than 150°C but not less than 60°C and a flashpoint of not less than 5°C. Type B diluents may be used for desensitization of all organic peroxides provided that the boiling point is at least 60°C higher than the SADT in a 50 kg package.

2.5.3.5.3
Diluents, other than type A or type B, may be added to organic peroxide formulations as listed in 2.5.3.2.4 provided that they are compatible. However, replacement of all or part of a type A or type B diluent by another diluent with differing properties requires that the organic peroxide formulation be re-assessed in accordance with the normal acceptance procedure for class 5.2.
2.5.3.5.4
Water may only be used for the desensitization of organic peroxides which are shown in 2.5.3.2.4 or in the statement of approval according to 2.5.3.2.5 as being with water or as a stable dispersion in water.
2.5.3.5.5
Organic and inorganic solids may be used for desensitization of organic peroxides provided that they are compatible.
2.5.3.5.6
Compatible liquids and solids are those which have no detrimental influence on the thermal stability and hazard type of the organic peroxide formulation.

Chapter 2.4

Chapter 2.6


  1. As determined by test series E as prescribed in the Manual of Tests and Criteria, part II.